Play together!

Last year, the National Council of Social Service (NCSS) and the Singapore Disability Sports Council (SDSC) introduced a fun guide to conduct inclusive games for all called ‘Let’s Play Together!’. In the guide, there are practical ideas and tips for caregivers, educators and practitioners to modify games like volleyball, basketball and bowling, so everyone can enjoy them including those with disabilities.

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A more inclusive society for those with disabilities

Srin Madipalli at an AbleThrive talk.

With a lot of recent talks about disabilities including the one held by AbleThrive (a platform for those with disabilities), Ageless Voice reached out to a former London lawyer Srin Madipalli, who launched an accessible travel website called Accomable, to find out about having a more inclusive society. Srin, 29, has spinal muscular atrophy which is a genetic disorder that affects the control of muscle movement and has confined him in a wheelchair for his whole life.

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A community centre within a community

The front of the community centre.

Late last year, when I went to Guangzhou, China, to speak at an ageing forum there, I visited Poly Garden’s community centre for seniors, which was launched in July 2015. It is membership-based and available for women from 55 and over, and men 60 and over.

The sign at the front of the centre.

It is open to the public as well as residents in the Poly Garden residential community, where the centre is located. According to officials, there are 5,000 families in the residential community, which was built over 10 years ago, and they are in an area where families are viewed as important.

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When age matters

Ageism in the workforce continues to be a major obstacle for many Singaporeans. Older workers are typically perceived to be slower, less productive and more resistant to change than their younger counterparts.

In an effort to reduce discrimination in the workplace, government leaders have recently promoted the idea of an “ageless” or “age-blind” Singapore, where employers will hire based on an applicant’s skills and experience rather than his or her age.

This is an appropriate response to the problem of workplace ageism. It is expected that by 2030, almost one in four residents in Singapore could be aged 65 or older. This trend is already underway in other industrialised nations such as Japan and Germany.

We will have to make the most of our labour capacity in order to continue thriving economically. The Tripartite Alliance for Fair and Progressive Employment Practices (TAFEP) has been calling on employers to see the value in mature workers, in preparation for an older workforce.

In our efforts to prevent discrimination, however, we must be careful not to completely disregard age. Doing so has its risks.

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A flexible retirement

The concept of retirement is changing rapidly. “As people live longer and in good health, retirement is becoming a more active life stage, with more people looking for the opportunity to combine work and leisure. Many workers have retired the notion of fully retiring at age 60 or 65,” said Catherine Collinson, executive director of the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement (ACLR) and president of the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies (TCRS).

ACLR in collaboration with TCRS recently released a new report titled “The New Flexible Retirement” (left), which illustrates that today’s workers are expecting to transition into retirement, however, they face a significant obstacle – few employers have employment practices to support them. The report is based on research from the Aegon Retirement Readiness Survey 2015, which comprises 16,000 workers and retirees and presents global trends and profiles of 15 countries including Asia.

Globally, the survey found that 51 percent of all workers now expect to retire at age 65 or later, or not at all. The mindset of working beyond traditional retirement age varies around the world; in Japan, 43 percent of survey respondents aspire to continue working past retirement compared to only 15 percent in France.

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